Endnotes

News from American Journalism and the American Journalism Historians Association

Awards

Vanessa Freije received the 2016 Margaret A. Blanchard Doctoral Dissertation Prize, presented by the American Journalism Historians Association. Freije won the award for her dissertation titled, “Journalists, Scandal and the Unraveling of One-Party Rule in Mexico, 1960-1988.”

The study, completed at Duke University under the direction of Jocelyn Olcott, examined the role that press scandals played in Mexican politics and argues that while political corruption was commonplace, journalists determined which transgressions would become flashpoints for public protest.

Two others won honorable mention:

  • Brian Shott for “Mediating America: Black and Irish Press and the Struggle for Citizenship, 1870-1914,” completed at the University of Southern California, Santa Cruz (director David Brundage).
  • James West for “Ebony Magazine, Lerone Bennett, Jr., and the Making and Selling of Black History, 1958-1987,” completed at the University of Manchester (director Eithne Quinn.)

Michael J. Socolow, an associate professor in the Department of Communication and Journalism at the University of Maine, is the winner of the Best Article Award presented by American Journalism. His article, “‘A Nation-Wide Chain Within 60 Days’: Radio Network Failure in Early American Broadcasting,” appeared in the Winter 2016 issue. The award honors research published in the journal during the last year that is original, rigorous, and makes an outstanding contribution to developing scholarship in the field of journalism and mass communication history.

Candi Carter Olson, an assistant professor in the Journalism and Communication Department at Utah State University, is the winner of American Journalism’s Rising Scholar Award for her research project, “The Rights of the Women of Zion, and the Rights of the Women of All Nations: The Woman’s Exponent and the Utah Women’s Press Club.” The award provides research assistance of $2,000 for a junior faculty member who has not yet achieved tenure. The proposed research project must be related to media history.

Jean Folkerts, visiting professor at the A. Q. Miller School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Kansas State University, received the American Journalism Historians Association Sidney Kobre Award for Lifetime Achievement in Journalism History. She is the co-author of Voices of a Nation: A History of Mass Media in the United States (Pearson, 2009) and the former editor of Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly. She also is the former dean of the School of Media and Journalism at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

Leonard Teel received the American Journalism Historians Association 2016 Book Award for Reporting the Cuban Revolution: How Castro Manipulated American Journalists (Louisiana State University Press, 2015). A retired faculty member in the Department of Communication at Georgia State University, he is also the author of Ralph Emerson McGill: Voice of a Southern Conscience and numerous articles on media history.

Wayne Dawkins, a professor at the Scripps School of Journalism and Communication at Hampton University, received the 2016 National Award for Excellence, presented by the American Journalism Historians Association. The award honors a college or university teacher who excels at teaching in the areas of journalism and mass communication history, makes a positive impact on student learning, and provides an outstanding example for other educators.

Announcements

The 36th annual American Journalism Historians Association convention will be held October 12-14, 2017, at the DoubleTree Hotel in Little Rock, Arkansas. The deadline to submit original research papers, panel proposals, and research in progress abstracts is May 15. More information about the convention is available at www.ajhaonline.org.

American Journalism seeks applicants for the Rising Scholar Award. The award provides research assistance for a junior faculty member who has not yet achieved tenure. The proposed research project must be related to media history. All methodological approaches are welcomed. Funding may be used for travel to work with archival collections, copying/digitization expenses for archival material, or to pay a research assistant. The deadline for nominations is June 1, 2017. More information about the award is available at www.ajhaonline.org.

Nominations are being accepted for the 2017 American Journalism Historians Association’s National Award for Excellence in Teaching. An honorarium of $500 accompanies the award, and the winner will be recognized at the AJHA convention. Nominees may be tenured or untenured, and should hold either a full- or part-time appointment at a college or university that confers an associate, baccalaureate or higher degree in journalism, mass communication, communication studies, or history, as of the submission due date.  Nominees must have responsibility for teaching the history of journalism and mass communication either as a stand-alone course or as part of a broader course. The deadline for nominations is June 30, 2017. More information about the award is available at www.ajhaonline.org.